While the country relies on strong partnerships with foreign universities to launch satellites like Diwata-2, the ultimate goal has been to build them here. This 2019, a new graduate program track launched at the UP Electrical and Electronics Engineering Institute aims to train our country’s future crop of satellite builders in-house. The STeP-UP program expands the Institute’s Masters in Engineering program to include a track specializing in nanosatellite engineering. The program welcomed its first batch of scholars this year, and they plan to launch two cube satellites when they graduate—this time completely made and designed in the Philippines.

Diwata-2 takes flight

The University of the Philippines PHL-Microsat Team and the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) achieved another milestone on October 29, 2018, as Diwata-2, the second microsatellite built and designed by Filipinos was launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan via the H-II F40 rocket.

How can we make a tumbling box in space obey our commands? In this feature, Engr. Ariston Gonzalez of the PHL-Microsat team tells the story of how their team built Diwata-2 to use various high-tech sensors to and instruments to point and shoot like a space-faring photographer.

Diwata-2, second PH microsatellite, set for launch

Diwata-2 is set to be launched on October 29, 2018 between 12:08 to 12:30 GMT+08 from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan via H-IIA F40 rocket. It is the Philippines’ second microsatellite developed and built under the Development of Philippine Scientific Earth Observation Microsatellite (PHL-Microsat) Program, which is funded by the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), monitored by DOST-Philippine Council for Industry and Emerging Technology Research and Development (PCIEERD), and done through the collaboration between the University of the Philippines Diliman, the DOST-Advanced Science and Technology Institute (ASTI), Hokkaido University and Tohoku University.